Evolution & adaptation in pathogenicity

“Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution” (T.Dobzhansky)

The host-pathogen interaction is no exception from this rule: while the pathogens adapt to the specific stresses and requirements inside their hosts, the hosts themselves are selected for best defense against damage done by these microorganisms. This evolutionary battle led to many astonishingly specific adaptations, from optimized nutrient uptake systems to our adaptive immunity.

We are interested in the mechanisms responsible for the adaptation of Candida albicans and C. glabrata, the two most important opportunistic pathogens among the Candida species, during the infection process. It is known for both species that they exhibit phenotypic and genotypic plasticity and can therefore react to changing environments by generating new phenotypes. For example, microevolution has clearly been demonstrated for the acquisition of high levels of antifungal drug resistance. In our laboratory, we used serial passage experiments to monitor the in vitro adaptation of fungi to macrophages, the “big eaters” of the immune system. We used two models: a wild type strain of C. glabrata and a hyphal-deficient C. albicans strain, which cannot escape from macrophages (as C. albicans normally does). In both cases we observed a striking change in the morphology of the strains after a series of co-culture passages. Usually, both strains grow as single cells, but during the microevolution experiment this growth form switched to a more filamentous form. Interestingly, the ability to form filaments is a well characterized virulence trait in wild type C. albicans, which was recreated here. We characterized the evolved strains in more detail using in vitro and in vivo experiments to investigate the impact of this phenotypic alteration on the pathogenicity of the strains. To determine the underlying genetic mechanisms, which cause the phenotypic alterations, we used different molecular techniques like microarrays, DNA and RNA sequencing. An in vivo adaptation experiment of C. albicans to the specific environment in the kidney complements our investigations into the adaptability of pathogenic yeasts in the host.

Staff

Sascha Brunke
Mathias Jansen
Theresa Rothe
Verena Trümper
Raghav Vij

Publications

Alonso-Monge R, Gresnigt MS, Román E, Hube B, Pla J (2021) Candida albicans colonization of the gastrointestinal tract: A double-edged sword. PLOS Pathog 17(7), e1009710.
Graf K, Hube B, Brunke S (2021) Experimental evolution of Candida by serial passaging in host cells. Methods Mol Biol 2260, 145-154.
Schaefer S, Pham TTP, Brunke S, Hube B, Jung K, Lenardon MD, Boyer C (2021) Rational design of an antifungal polyacrylamide library with reduced host-cell toxicity. ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 13(23), 27430-27444.
Siscar-Lewin S, Gabaldón T, Aldejohann AM, Kurzai O, Hube B, Brunke S (2021) Transient mitochondria dysfunction confers fungal cross-resistance against phagocytic killing and fluconazole. mBio 12(3), e0112821.
Sprenger M, Brunke S, Hube B, Kasper L (2021) A TRP1-marker-based system for gene complementation, overexpression, reporter gene expression, and gene modification in Candida glabrata. FEMS Yeast Res 20(8), foaa066.
Van Ende M, Timmermans B, Vanreppelen G, Siscar-Lewin S, Fischer D, Wijnants S, Romero CL, Yazdani S, Rogiers O, Demuyser L, Van Zeebroeck G, Cen Y, Kuchler K, Brunke S, Van Dijck P (2021) The involvement of the Candida glabrata trehalase enzymes in stress resistance and gut colonization. Virulence 12(1), 329-345.
Vij R, Hube B, Brunke S (2021) Uncharted territories in the discovery of antifungal and antivirulence natural products from bacteria. Comput Struct Biotechnol J 19, 1244-1252. (Review)
Commichau FM, Anstatt J, Krappmann S, Stegmann E, Banhart S, Papenfort K, Brunke S, Hube B, Bramkamp M, Herbert M, Sander J, Mueller JW, Wagner M, Daus ML (2020) Wettrüsten zwischen Pilz und Wirt. BIOSpektrum 26(3), 280-286. (Review)
Ho J, Wickramasinghe DN, Nikou SA, Hube B, Richardson JP, Naglik JR (2020) Candidalysin is a potent trigger of alarmin and antimicrobial peptide release in epithelial cells. Cells 9(3), 699.
König A, Müller R, Mogavero S, Hube B (2020) Fungal factors involved in host immune evasion, modulation and exploitation during infection. Cell Microbiol 23(1), e13272. (Review)